Head of Mars

A work made of marble.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

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  • A work made of marble.

Date:

2nd century AD

Artist:

Roman

About this artwork

Roman sculpture reached its most massive scale during the second century A.D., when enormous statues were created to adorn public buildings such as baths, theaters, and temples. This over-life-size head once belonged to a monumental statue of Mars, the Roman god of war, who is commonly associated with the Greek god Ares. Here the stern-faced deity wears a magnificent helmet decorated with griffins, fantastical winged beasts associated with Nemesis, the goddess of revenge. On each cheek guard is an image of Cupid, the god of desire, carrying a spear and shield. In Roman religion, Mars was closely associated with Cupid’s mother, Venus (the Greek Aphrodite), the goddess of love.

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Ancient and Byzantine Art

Culture

Ancient Roman

Title

Head of Mars

Origin

Roman Empire

Date

101 AD–200 AD

Medium

Marble

Dimensions

59.2 × 29.5 × 37.8 cm (23 1/3 × 11 5/8 × 14 7/8 in.)

Credit Line

Katherine K. Adler Memorial Fund

Reference Number

1984.1

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email .

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