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Statuette of the God Horus as a Child (Harpokrates)

A work made of bronze.
CC0 Public Domain Designation

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  • A work made of bronze.

Date:

Late Period–early Ptolemaic Period (7th–1st centuries BCE)

Artist:

Egyptian

About this artwork

The child god Horus was worshipped as the hero-to-be who would avenge his father’s murder. Horus also symbolized eternal life through his role as the sun, battling evil at night to rise triumphant every morning. The Greek form of the Egyptian “Horus the Child” is “Harpokrates.” The god’s youth is indicated by his side lock of hair and his finger touching his mouth. The Greeks and later the Romans worshipped him with his parents as part of a growing interest in mystery cults promising a true and real life after death.

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Ancient and Byzantine Art

Culture

Ancient Egyptian

Title

Statuette of the God Horus as a Child (Harpokrates)

Origin

Egypt

Date

700 BCE–1 BCE

Medium

Bronze

Dimensions

19.1 × 7.6 × 6.4 cm (7 1/2 × 3 × 2 1/2 in.)

Credit Line

Gift of Henry H. Getty, Charles L. Hutchinson, Robert H. Fleming, and Norman W. Harris

Reference Number

1894.365

Extended information about this artwork

Object information is a work in progress and may be updated as new research findings emerge. To help improve this record, please email . Information about image downloads and licensing is available here.

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